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hear the different stories on taiwan. i am your host, wu ray-kuo. higher education is very important to the continued development of any economy. i want is no exception. on today's program, we are delighted and a national lighted and honored to have professor kung-yee liang yang-ming university, the professor of, to share his date on -- share his thoughts on the state of higher education in taiwan erie >> i am honored to be here. i am currently the president of the national university. >> you have been the was a -- have been the president of national yang-ming university you -- since 2010. can you give us a general assessment of the state of higher education in taiwan today? >> sure. i think we are facing numerous challenges for higher education in taiwan. the first thing that comes to many people's minds as we are facing a crisis of having fewer newborn born every year. not long ago, it was 200,000 a year and now it has dropped to about 140,000. i think in a sense the impact of the university is number one. the other one is we are surrounded by regions like hong kong and singapore t
. what can be better than that? the title of my book is "why teach" in defense for a real education. that is a really hard question i would like to put on the shelf for a while. but in defense for a real education, that's why i want to try to work with a little bit. so let me ask this question what is this thing a real education? and i want to say against the disposition of the culture at large a lot of fellow scholars from the university of this point it is humanities based. the real the education is a humanities based education. why? first of all the humanities based education is conducive to the development of citizens. conducive to the development of citizens. our founder thomas jefferson wanted to create a university that would help people become citizens independent republic. it's one of the reasons he brought us the university of virginia and one of the reasons we are here. it seems to me that there is no better preparation for becoming a citizen for the united states of america or citizen of the world than a humanities education. in the humanities we learn to express ourselv
and the presents that if it faces an educated different stories on taiwan. on the host grateful. high rates of teaching is very important to the continued development of any economy and taiwan's is no exception. on today's program was delighted and honored to have put ice in them going he who is currently the president of national young university to share with as his piece on the state of high education in taiwan will come to the program doesn't help thank you mama to be here and colleen am currently the prison of a nation we i mean is that this was a little whooping the president on national young university since two thousand and ten can you please start off the program give this a general assessment of the state of high education in town went to take her. i think that though we are facing numerous talented student for hyde education to want to imprison come to mind probably too many people's mind is that though we facing the prices of any of you and your warm breath does every year. not too long was above twenty thousand pts for years been no drop to forty and fifty others. so even if y
, the director for the georgetown university center for education in the workforce. about a newo talk study done by the organization of economic cooperation and development. what was the headline from the study? guest: essentially that the united states is losing its competitive edge in its workforce, not so much at the top. we are pretty good at the top, that is, our best workers are as highly skilled as anyone. it is in the middle and towards the bottom of the education distribution where we are increasingly falling behind in 21st-century skills. host: what are those skills, what are we falling behind on? oldt: it used to be in the days, only the professional or technical worker needed skills like problem solving, vertical thinking, a variety of other skills, the ability to use knowledge effectively to solve problems. nowadays, in modern economies, virtually all workers need them. workers in almost every business or employee organization needs manage in a to modern competitive environment. host: who did the testing, what did they test? how do you test those things in adults? everyone has seen
is the girl who was attacked by the taliban, shot merely for speaking out about a girls right to education. she's here tonight at 11:00 p.m. on a school night. [ laughter ] because she is irresponsible. [ laughter ] malala and i'm totally fan girling! [cheers and applause] i don't know. [cheers and applause] someone in the audience taught me what that is. they asked me if i was fan girl being something and i was like, i don't know what you are saying. they explained it to me. you fan girl hard or you don't. and you also have to put your hands like this. [ laughter ] [cheers and applause] she's on the show tonight. now -- [cheers and applause] here is another reason i'm excited. i'm not leading off with the government shutdown. not doing it. tired of it. switching it up. swept for this one thing getting under my skin. there's a republican lack of what i like to call ownership over the current predicament. >> this is harry reid's shutdown. this is not the republican shutdown. this is harry connick, jr. and brac brac's shut -- barack obama's shutdown. >> democrats refused to budge. >> no will
-old pakistani shot by the taliban on her way to school, now an international voice for education. >> god has given me this new life for the cause of education, and i believe that even death is supporting the cause of education. even dead did not want to kill me so how can the taliban? >> woodruff: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> my customers can shop around; see who does good work and compare costs. it can also work that way with healthcare. with united healthcare, i get information on quality ratings of doctors, treatment options and estimates for how much i'll pay. that helps me and my guys make informed decisions. i don't like guesses with my business and definitely not with our health. that's health in numbers. united healthcare. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions an
a long journey from schoolgirl to activist. education for all campaigner, malala yousafzai, almost died a year ago at the hands of the taliban. in the time since, she's recovered, continued to speak out and is now considered a favorite to win the nobel peace prize later this week. nhk world's mitsuko nishikawa reports. >> reporter: malala yousafzai is unlike any child her age. the 16-year-old education campaigner has gone from a hospital bed to speaking at the united nations in the span of a year. >> instead of sending weapons, instead of sending tanks to afghanistan and all these countries which are suffering from terrorism, send books. instead of sending tanks, send pens. instead of sending soldiers, send teachers. >> reporter: malala first gained attention as a blogger who documented life in the taliban controlled area of swat valley in pakistan. she wrote about extremist attempts to stop girls from getting an education. that made her a target. taliban gunmen stormed her school bus a year ago and shot her in the head. the assassination attempt left her in critical condition. she was
, technology e education and business, what startups are doing to make learning more effective and more accessible. first, though, how commodities, treasuries and currencies performed today. >>> there under score, may be a deal in the works to make federal charges against the hedge fund and the billionaire funder go away but it will cost him a ton of money if it happens. the securities and exchange commission is asking for $1.8 billion to make a criminal insider trading case against steven acohen disappear. he agreed to pay $600 million to settle civil fcc charges and avoid a trial. >>> at the annual education summit this week is combatting the skyrocketing cost of higher education. so some investors and entrepreneurs are jumping on a new opportunity, ed text startups, companies schools use new technology to bring educational opportunities to students almost everywhere. julia boorstin has more. >> a hot top pick at nbc's education nation conference is ed tech. they use technology to make education effective and accessible. the internet mobile devices and social tools are giving students
to this government shutdown. this g.o.p. majority has slashed funding for the education, including impact aid, impact aid school districts have been harder hit than any other school districts as they struggle to provide quality education for the children of active military and native american students due to the g.o.p. sequester, many of these school districts have been reduced to four-day school weeks. this is a reckless and irresponsible way to govern. our nation's children and families deserve more not less. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from illinois rise? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. >> thank you. mr. speaker, i rise again today to continue speaking out about the human consequences of this ridiculous government shutdown. we are now one full week into this shameful display of irresponsibility. yesterday i spoke with a man in my district named joe burton, he's a decorated war hero, se
of girls to go to school and get an education. but she survived that and after a long recovery, as you may know, she's now continuing to spread her message of empowerment and education. we get an update on her tonight from nbc's kate snow. >> we girls can change the world. are you girls with me? >> reporter: today malala's stage was the world bank. >> you can see the children are starving for education. and we need to help them. >> reporter: earlier in the week, it was "the daily show" touting her new book. >> they do not want women to get education because then women will become more powerful. >> happy 16th birthday, malala. >> reporter: and back in july, a standing ovation at the united nations on her 16th birthday. >> we must speak up with the books. they are the most powerful weapons. >> reporter: she was fighting for her life, shot in the head by the taliban just for saying girls have the right to be educated. today children prayed she would win the nobel. she deserve s it, says her friend. when it didn't happen, people across the globe expressed their disappointment. but those who kn
. >> people look to us for help and education about the health care system. they have forever. >> reporter: alan miller is optimistic but in no rush to add staff. next year will be a time to watch and learn how the newly insured respond to being covered under obama care. bertha coombs, "nightly business report." >>> to market focus now, we begin with j.c. penney. shares rose after the company said sales trends are improving. the department store posted a smaller decline in september seams and expects the improvement to continue. according to the company, women's and men's apparel and fine jewelry are improving. stock up to $7.77. just a year ago it was trading around $27 a share. >>> big job cuts announced. it will slash 10,000 jobs worldwide over the next two years, that's 14% of the work force. those reductions could save $1.3 billion a year and restore profits at the struggling telecom equipment maker. shares fell more than 9% today to $3.49. >>> shares of xerox. it focuses on accounting practices at affiliated computer services, an it outsourcing firm that xerox bought in 2010. the fcc
at education nation. i am tim tooten. that story, coming up. >> a forgotten member of the ravens defense cannot wait. we will tell you why. >> are easy and cool and wet about senator theater is to reopen. it is like taking a trip back to 1939, when the senator originally opened, and there was some cleaning for tomorrow's sold-out opening that will benefit the pratt library. >> row seats for the reception .ill benefit the organization >> you have to be so proud of this theater. >> we are so proud. it has been a labor of love, but we have made it to get >> in addition to the main theater, there are now three new smaller theaters, and soon, there will also be a wine bar. school district are spending millions of dollars to bring more technology to the classroom. >> but some are asking, are educators paying too much attention to technology? we have more from education nation in new york. >> there are some education nation that believe that bringing some technology like this to the classroom will not meet the challenges of students. school-based technology was a common theme, but a handful of startup
to be better and better salaries and infrastructure and better education. >> reporter: there is mass marches in support of school teachers on strike for two months and joe will be here to tell you why this puerto rico boss will make history in his first world title fight and stay with us, we will be back after the break. ♪ welcome back, you are watching the news hour on al jazeera and reminder of the top story, arrival of a giant u.s. area craft carrier in south korea is alarming the north and put the arm forces on high alert and missile test is carried out. apex summit in bali indonesia will increase trade and investment to boost the economy and china and japan and united states told them to sort out the debt crisis. and the special forces tried to capture in somalia is al shabaab leader and alleged to be responsible for attacks on u.s. interest for years. and it's been more than ten years since nigeria passed a law banning child labor but the international organization said there are 15 million children working there. in the final part of our series looking at child labor around the worl
into our children's education, the destruction of our liberties. that's what's on the ballot. >> may i say one thing? listen to my opponents rhetoric. listen to his positions. it seems like he's doing more to try to run and replace rush limbaugh and then frank lautenberg. , that's the kind of rhetoric that is going to drive further gridlock and further divisiveness. we need to have leaders like myself who won't say, i won't work with anybody. please understand, governor christie and i have a lot of disagreements, from our sports teams to the fact that he is losing weight and i'm gaining weight -- he and i have worked together as partners on education, economic development. that he bashes of mine comes from a republican- democratic partnership to turn -- to turn newark around. every reporter is showing the progress of newark, standing with republicans to open hole through the to newark. >> let's move to another issue. >> i need to address this. you've really given the edge to my opponent throughout the whole debate. >> what's on your mind? >> opponent has mentioned chris christie a number o
mobil in advancing math and science education. let's solve this. afghanistan in 2009. on the u.s.s. saratoga in 1982. [ male announcer ] once it's earned, usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve current and former military members and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. icaused by acid reflux disease, relieving heartburn, relief is at hand. for many, nexium provides 24-hour heartburn relief and may be available for just $18 a month. there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. if you have persistent diarrhea, contact your doctor right away. other serious stomach conditions may exist. don't take nexium if you take clopidogrel. relief is at hand for just $18 a month. talk to your doctor about nexium. cholera, chol . >>> we are back as promised with our exclusive reporting about who is responsible for the monumental health crisi
an education and to get back home. my parents took us back home and raised us there. that whole sort of movement of time has moved -- brought more immigrants into the united states from africa who come here and build homes here and lives here but still bring their language here and there expression of self here and andte a hybrid meld of self i feel like it is fascinating to me, watching my own family and seeing my cousins have children here, seeing the generations go on and say how people are connected to their home but are of course americans, to, and that sort of hybrided sense of self is something i yearned to see more of expressed. tavis: what is it about that african expression on american african americans still do not get? >> that is a big question. i still do not get -- tavis: do not get, do not appreciate. there is always this ongoing conversation between black folk and african folk or black americans and african americans or africans, i should say that you're going to go to any barbershop on any given day and you have some black folk talking about africans and african talk
and fiscal responsibility. he serves on the foreign relations, health, education labor and pensions, small business, and government affairs committees. will you please welcome a senator who represents your values in washington, d.c., rand paul. ♪ ♪ a >> thank you. does anybody have a message that i can carry to the president? >> [indiscernible] >> and i am in a toyota prius. if you need a ride back to the white house, we will take you along. today i want to talk about something that is serious. i want to talk about a war that the mainstream media is ignoring, from boston to zanzibar. there is a worldwide war on christianity. christians are being attacked around the world, but you will not hear much about it on the evening news, because the answer is not convenient. it does not fit the narrative we have heard about it radical islam. the media describes the killings as sectarian. but the truth is a worldwide war on christians is being waged by fanatical elements of islam. ever since 9/11 commentators have tried to avoid pointing fingers at islam, which is somewhat fair. it is fair to poi
and reopen the government, nobody seems to want to take that deal. education nation. today a look at the challenges for higher ed from teacher tenure to degree disparities. we have a former party powerbroker turned boilermaker. former indiana governor and current university president mitch daniels joins me. good morning from washington. it's tuesday october 8th, 2013. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. let's get to my first raelds of the morning. today we're trying to get a little closer to the root of the shutdown and the deadlocked congress. plenty of reasons for it from lawmakers perfecting the art of gerrymandering to the rise of ideological media and social media echo chambers that reinforced the divisions. but one of the biggest reasons, political parties themselves have become decentralized and weak. the days of parties and their bosses holding the pursestrings while candidates are forced to play party politics are long gone. if you're a prospective candidate and get rejected by a party, you can get support from interest groups. if you can't do that and you're ric
ignorance behind, leaves the past behind to become an enlightened educated independent and cool. amanda books, a man of learning, and men of science, a man of papers, a man of letters, a spectacle. 1771 the year benjamin franklin said his sister jane eyeglasses is also due to begin writing that story of his life. it wasn't published until his death in 1790. benjamin franklin's autobiography is one of the most important autobiographies ever written. it helped even invent the word. the word autobiography wasn't going until 1797, seven years later. is was a private life made public. it's also an allegory about america, the story of a man as a story of the nation. self-made, rags to riches, the story of america, a spectacle for all the world to see. in that story he left his sister out. never once did he so much as mention her. where does that leave her unfortunate biographer? one half the world is not the other the other half lives, franklin once wrote. his sister i think is his other half. and if his life is an allegory, so is hers. but an allegory for what? her life was not a spectacle.
they can kill my cause. my cause of education, peace, rights. my cause of equality will still be surviving. they cannot kill my cause. >> malala at the 92nd street y last night to the disappointment of advocates for women and girls education around the world malala was passed over for the nobel peace prize in favor of the u.n. agency that helps ban chemical weapons in syria. pakistani school girl began speaking out for the right to be educated when she was only 11 incurring wrath of regional taliban. when she insisted taliban gunman boarded her school bus and shot her in the head. malala was evacuated to england for extensive surgery and now at the age of 16 become a worldwide advocate and role model for women and girls. joining me is nbc news pakistan bureau chief who spent a lot of time not only covering the story but also with the family. great to see you. >> thanks. >> thanks for coming in and being here today. tell me the meaning of malala and what she has created and how disappointed she and her supporters are that she did not get the nobel. >> andrea, as you know, there was so much
support themselves and their families. they are better off than the educated. >> reporter: back in the mine his focus is to make money and probably [ inaudible ] there are millions like him in nigeria who are out of school and out of luck at the moment, and unless the government finds a way of stopping the exploitation, millions more will never know the joy of childhood. >>> the director of the african child trust in london says that basic poverty is the underlying problem behind child labor. >> i suppose the overarching problem is the age of poverty. i think a lot of people when they think of nigeria, they think of the oil, and they think of the wealth that is more in itself a veneer. below which is significant amount of poverty, and i think that some of the problems that you have -- your reporters highlighted are the ages that come to the surface when you peel off the veneer. i think the key issues are the government needs to redirect its focus into the issues that surround poverty. those issues in my view, that of education, that of providing social infrastructure that would
and training them in education about chemical weapons awareness and starting to brief them on what the opc is doing and they are not all supporters and do not see it in the same way that the p 5 and others do and really need to be convinced that taking chemical weapons out of syria is in their best interest and likely to bring some sort of peace. over all i think the opcw deserves and dues a fantastic job but what happens in syria in the next week and month is key and with that support it will be a really challenging task. >> reporter: this is not an organization which is largely accepted worldwide and there are a handful of countries which have yet to sign the convention upon which this chemical weapons group was based. among them angola, north korea and sedan and what are problems convincing countries such as this not to join, why would they not want to join this? >> well some of the countries you mentioned had previously been described by others of access of evil and it's important to note that syria has now joined the chemical weapons convention which is why the opcw can go in and do
's spending that comes out of things like education and social services and health and n.i.h., the center for disease control and prevention, all those other things. now, again, we heard a lot of talk by republicans on the senate side that we, democrats, were violating the budget control act by coming in at a higher level than what sequestration called for. at the same time, the republicans on the house side violated the budget control act by not taking 50-50. in other words, the budget control act said that if sequestration goes into effect, then the cuts have to be made 50% from defense and 50% from nondefense. the ryan budget, what they did in the house, they left -- they left defense whole and took everything out of, as i said, everything else, mainly out of health, education, labor, that pot of money. so i guess what you would say is both sides violated the budget control act. no. both sides had their approach on how to deal with the budget control act. the budget control act is not the ten commandments written in stone for all eternity. it's a law. and when we have laws around here,
. >>> coming up, an inspiring story of courage. walking for five days and nights to get an education. >> at night it was really cold. we slept under rocks. >> the bay area student who literally walked to freedom to become the first in her family to go to college. that story coming up next. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, to thsuffered in silence... hoped... and lived in a state of fear... welcome to a new state... of health. welcome to covered california. the place to find quality, affordable coverage. financial help for those in need. and nobody can be denied because of a pre-existing condition. enroll now at coveredca.com. now, she's focusing her time helping kids facing overwhelming odds to get an education. . >>> wendy is a veteran award winning journalist. she's focusing her time to help children get an education. >> wendy profiles a student from a tiny village in tibet who was the first in her family to go to college. the girl understands freedom some americans may not. >> orientation at oxford college in georgia. she is just one face in a crowd here. but she was a stand out at commencement at
. and they're highly educated but struggling to make ends meet. a look at america's new working poor. >>> plus talking about recession resistant. now one entrepreneur made an entire business out of meatballs. i'm ali velshi, and this is "real money." >> this is "real money." you are the most important part of our show. so join the conference by using the #aj real money. we're 15 days into a government shutdown. and new study warns even if the u.s. temporarily defaults on its obligations a brief recession could be the result in 2014. that would push the jobless rate to 8.5%. it would cost 2.5 million jobs according to macroeconomic advisers firm in st. louis and others have predicted similar forecasts. others predict the recession would last longer and unemployment would rise to 8.9%. 3.1 million jobs lost. blame will rest squarely on the officials you collected to washington. here's why, the whole percentage point has been shaved off economic growth since 2010. if not for the uncertainty coming out of washington the report estimates the jobless rate would be .6 of a percentage point
just spoken with the incredibly brave 16-year-old advocate for girl's education in pakistan nearly died when she was shot in the head by the taliban. she might win the nobel peace prize tomorrow. christiane amanpour joins us on the panel next. i was made to work. make my mark with pride. create moments of value. build character through quality. and earn the right to be called a classic. the lands' end no iron dress shirt. starting at 49 dollars. add brand new belongings from nationwide insurance and we'll replace stolen or destroyed items with brand-new versions. we put members first. join the nation. ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ at kaiser permanente we've reduced serious heart attacks by 62%, which makes days with grandpa jack 100% more possible. join us at kp.org and thrive. >>> welcome back to the show. an incredibly brave 16-year-old girl from pakistan may soon become the youngest person to win the nobel peace prize. the prize will be announced tomorrow. talking about malala yousavsai. she became an activist as a child speaking up for education after the taliban banned girls f
education needs improvement in this country. what this survey does it ex trap hat trap lates. it's an extrapolation. >> 3 million jobs are available in the united states right now. perhaps even more. and they are unable to fill them because they don't have enough qualified or skilled workers. >> that's a big part. that's one of the reasons we debate immigration. >> not only about immigration but also about having to educate and help adults transition, mid-career adults make the transitions. >> what's distressing about the study it shows the difficulty if your parents are not well-educated. didn't go to college. the difficulty of surpassing them. the difficulty of getting a college education if your parents haven't. >> upward mobility. >> which in the united states is a huge deal. >> our whole national identity is tied into it. when that goes away we lose our national identity. >> let me tell you something so we don't all get depressed about the future of this country. as you know i'm at harvard this semester as a fellow. i have met a number of kids there who are just the most spe
at an education thanks to a pair of texas billionaire philanthropists. laura and john arnold are donating $10 million to help reopen head start programs across the country. in a statement today the arnolds said they believe it is especially unfair that young children from underprivileged communities and working families are paying the price for the shutdown. hey you should take advil. why? you can take four advil for all day relief. so i should give up my two aleve for more pills with advil? you're joking right? for my back pain, i want my aleve. [ male announcer ] let's go places. but let's be ready. ♪ let's do our homework. ♪ let's look out for each other. let's look both ways before crossing. ♪ let's remember what's important. let's be optimistic. but just in case -- let's be ready. toyota. let's go places, safely. but just in case -- let's be ready. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education
, a dispatch from pakistan on one group's mission to improve access to education. >> many children don't attend school in pakistan and on average girls are half as lookly as boys to be enrolled. >> woodruff: and we remember the late author oscar hijuelos, the first latino ever to win a pulitzer prize for fiction. >> i never thought i would be a writer growing up, i certainly never thought that as a kismted and even when a lot of people around me expressed strong confidence in what they saw as my gifts or emerging gift, i always doubted them. >> woodruff: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's pbs newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> united healthcare-- online at uhc.com. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,042 (some duplicates have been removed)

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